Article Written by Casey Midgley on April 28, 2013

35 Best Fonts that withstood the test of time.

35 Best fonts of all time!

Best fonts of all time derived after we realised that there are millions of terrible fonts out there that are straight up rubbish.
We have compiled a list of typefaces (fonts) that have been used time and time again for a vast array of projects. Including logo design, signage, paragraph text (books), posters and a number of other mediums. Most of these typefaces have been used for so long and for so many projects due to the simple fact that they work. Their letterforms created by the negative space that surround them have proven there status within the design world.

So, here goes!
35 Best fonts of all time in no specific order whatsoever!

 

1 – Times (1931)
In 1931, The Times of London commissioned Stanley Morison to create a new type design for the body copy of the newspaper. Times is actually a modernised version of the older typeface “Plantin”

Times Font best fonts

2 – Univers (1954)
Realist sans-serif typeface designed by Adrian Frutiger in 1954. Released in 1957 by Deberny & Peignot. A French Type foundry later bought out by Haas Type Foundry (Switzerland) in 1972.

univers best fonts

3 – Futura (1927)
Futura is a geometric sans-serif typeface designed in 1927 by Paul Renner. It is based on geometric shapes that became representative of visual elements of the Bauhaus design style of 1919–1933.

futura best fonts

4 – MetroBlack #2 (1929)
Designed in 1929 by W.A. Dwiggins to compete with Futura. A warmer and less mechanical Geometric version.

Metro-Black

5 – Helvetica (1957)
“One of the Best Fonts ever created!” Helvetica is a widely used sans-serif typeface developed in 1957 by Swiss typeface designer Max Miedinger with Eduard Hoffmann. One of the most known and used Typeface’s created. Just look at American Airlines Logo (Before their ReDesign), American Apparel, Nestle, Kawasaki, General Motors, Jeep, Toyota, BMW, Microsoft, Target, Panasonic, Tupperware, 3M, Scotch Tape, Caterpillar, Skype, Energizer, Oral B, Harley Davidson, Olympus, The North Face, Motorola, Mattel, Blaupunkt – Even our logo is based on Helvetica. Helvetica is Everywhere! Get used to it!

helvetica best fonts

6 – Baskerville (1757)
A Serif font designed by John Baskerville in 1757. Originating from England, Baskerville positioned itself between the modernist styles of Giambattista Bodoni & Firmin Didot.

baskerville best fonts

7 – Souvenir (1914)
An old style serif typeface, designed in 1914 by Morris Fuller Benton for American Type Founders. It was loosely based on the Art Nouveau styles of Schelter-Antiqua & Schelter-Kursiv.

Souvenir best fonts

8 – Gotham (2000)
A family of geometric sans-serif digital typefaces designed by American type designer Tobias Frere-Jones in 2000. Gotham was Inspiried by Architectural Signage from the mid-twentieth century.

Gotham best fonts

9 – Miller (1997)
Released in 1997 by the Font Bureau, a U.S.-based digital type foundry. It was designed by Matthew Carter (also known for early web fonts Georgia & Verdana) based on the “Scotch Roman” style.

Miller best fonts

10 – Georgia (1993)
A transitional typeface designed by Mathew Carter in 1993 for Microsoft as the first serif companion to Microsoft’s first screen font, Verdana.

Georgia best fonts

11 – Walbaum (1804)
Released in 1804 by Justus Erich Walbaum. Originally punchcut in Weimar, the designer was inspired by other Modern Didone typefaces that had been created, such as Bodoni and Didot.

walbaum best fonts

12 – Eurostile (1962)
A geometric sans-serif typeface designed by Aldo Novarese in 1962. Novarese originally made Eurostile for one of the best-known Italian foundriesNebiolo, in Turin.

Eurostile

13 – Gill Sans (1928)
The original design appeared in 1926 when Douglas Cleverdon opened a bookshop in his home town of Bristol, where Gill painted the fascia over the window in sans-serif capitals that would later be known as Gill Sans. Later released in 1928 by Gill Sans for the Monotype Corporation.

Gill-Sans

14 – Courier (1955)
Originally Designed by Howard “Bud” Kettler in 1955, and later redrawn by Adrian Frutigerfor the IBM Selectric. A monospaced slab serif typeface designed to resemble the output from a strike-on typewriter.

courier best fonts

15 – Triplex (1985)
Designed by Zuzana Licko and John Downer in 1985 and 1989. It is distributed by Emigre. It is used by Prezi for its logo.

Triplex

16 – Clarendon (1845)
An English slab-serif typeface that was created in England by Robert Besley for Thorowgood and Co and was first published in 1845 after Besley was made a partner in the firm.

Clarendon

17 – Avant Garde (1970)
A font family based on the logo font used in the Avant Garde magazine. Herb Lubalin devised the logo concept then he and Tom Carnase, a partner in Lubalin’s design firm, worked together to transform the idea into a typeface. ITC Avant Garde was released in 1970.

Avant-Garde

18 – Rockwell (1934)
serif typeface belonging to the classification slab serif. The typeface was designed at theMonotype foundry’s in-house design studio in 1934

Rockwell

19 – News Gothic (1908)
A realist sans-serif typeface designed by Morris Fuller Benton, and released by the American Type Founders (ATF) in 1908.

News-Gothic

20 – American Typewriter (1974)
Created in 1974 by Joel Kaden and Tony Stan for International Typeface Corporation based on the form and monospaced feature of the early Sholes’s patent of thetypewriter.

american-typewriter

21 – ITC Officina (1990)
A beautiful set of serif & sans-serif typefaces created by Erik Spiekermann and released in 1990. To accommodate more information on a page, this face is slightly condensed.

officina

22 – Geogrotesque (2008)
Geogrotesque is a semi modular with a subtle rounded finish typeface. Designed in 2008 & Released by the Emtype Foundry.

geogrotesque

23 – Garamond (1480–1561)
A family of old-style serif typefaces derived from the work of Claude Garamond in the sixteenth century; most Garamond fonts have become renowned for their excellent readability, elegance, and character. Claude Garamond came to prominence in the 1540s, first for a Greek typeface he was commissioned to create for the French king Francis I, to be used in a series of books by Robert Estienne.

Garamond

24 – Frutiger (1968)
A series of typefaces named after its designer, Adrian Frutiger. Initially available as a sans serif, it was later expanded to include ornamental and serif typefaces. It was commissioned in 1968 by the newly built Charles de Gaulle International Airport at Roissy, France, which needed a new directional sign system.

frutiger

25 – Franklin Gothic (1902)
Designed by the American type designer who is responsible for over 180 typestyles, Morris F. Benton in the early 1900’s, Franklin Gothic has been for over 90 years one of the most popular typefaces ever.

Franklin-Gothic

 

26 – Din Schriften (1968)
realist sans-serif typeface that is widely used for traffic, administrative and technical applications. It was defined by the German standards body DIN – Deutsches Institut für Normung (German Institute for Standardization) in the standard sheet DIN 1451Schriften (typefaces) in 1931.

Din-Schriften

27 – Copperplate Gothic (1901)
Copperplate Gothic is a typeface designed by Frederic W. Goudy and released by the American Type Founders (ATF) in 1901.

Copperplate-Gothic

28 – Chalet (1996)
This collection of ten typefaces in three unique styles is the creative genius of acclaimed clothing designer René Albert Chalet. Originally used in his early advertising campaigns, Chalet appropriately echoes the attitude of its creator: function with flair. Released in 1996 by House Industries.

Chalet

 

29 – Bodoni (1798)
A series of serif typefaces first designed by Giambattista Bodoni (1740–1813) in 1798. The typeface is classified as Didone modern. Bodoni followed the ideas of John Baskerville, as found in the printing type Baskerville.

bodoni

30 – Bernhard Modern (1937)
Bernhard Modern was designed in 1937 by Lucian Bernhard for ATF. It is his personal version of the small x-height engravers’ old styles popular at the time.

bernhard-modern best fonts

31 – Bernhard Condensed (1926)
The version is comparable to the schmalfette version from Bauer, but in fact first came from Monotype in 1926 with its unique spelling as Bernard.

Bernard-Condensed

32 – Avenir (1988)
Avenir, designed by Adrian Frutiger in 1988, was created as a more contemporary version of Futura crossed with Univers. Originally Released by Linotype GmbH and is now a subsidiary of Monotype Corporation.

avenir

 

33 – Akzidenz Grotesk (1896)
grotesque (early sans-seriftypeface originally released by the Berthold Type Foundry in 1896 under the name Accidenz-Grotesk. It was one of the first sans serif typeface to be widely used and influenced many later neo-grotesque typefaces after 1950 including the infamous Max Miedinger‘s Helvetica, Adrian Frutiger’s Univers & Bauer and Baum’s Folio.

Akzidenz-Grotesk best fonts

 

34 – Adobe Caslon (1896)
William Caslon released his first typefaces in 1722. Caslon’s types were based on seventeenth-century Dutch old style designs, which were then used extensively in England. The first printings of the American Declaration of Independence and the Constitution were set in Caslon.

adobe-caslon best fonts

 

35 – Trade Gothic (1948)
A sans-serif typeface first designed in 1948 by Jackson Burke (1908–1975), who continued to work on further style-weight combinations (eventually 14 in all) until 1960 while he was director of type development for Linotype in the USA.

TRADE-GOTHIC Best Fonts

 

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Full List of 35 Best Fonts;

Not in any specific order whatsoever!

1. Times (1931)
2. Univers (1954)
3. Futura (1927)
4. Metro Black (1929)
5. Helvetica (1957)
6. Baskerville (1757)
7. Souvenir (1914)
8. Gotham (2000)
9. Miller (1997)
10. Georgia (1993)
11. Walbaum (1804)
12. Eurostile (1962)
13. Gill Sans (1928)
14. Courier (1955)
15. Triplex (1985)
16. Clarendon (1845)
17. Avant Garde (1970)
18. Rockwell (1934)
19. News Gothic (1908)
20. American Typewriter (1974)
21. ITC Officina (1990)
22. Geogrotesque (2008)
23. Garamond (1480-1561)
24. Frutiger (1968)
25. Franklin Gothic (1902)
26. DIN Schriften (1968)
27. Copperplate Gothic (1901)
28. Chalet (1996)
29. Bodoni (1798)
30. Bernhard Modern (1937)
31. Bernhard Condensed (1926)
32. Avenir (1988)
33. Akzidenz Grotesk (1896)
34. Adobe Caslon (1896)
35. Trade Gothic (1948)